AboutWriting

🔗Website

🔗Demo


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Framer's Component Picker


Appendix

Earned Secrets

  1. Before using Miurror, people concern what if they have a flat face when texting? After they used it, we found out even a flat expression means more than just text.
  2. People deliberately express facial expressions when they reply to DM to delight friends.
  3. Facial emotions are way more immersive in building relationships with new friends.
  4. Most humans are comfortable doing face expressions as long as they won’t see their true faces.

Why Miurror

I have been exploring this idea since I started playing Fortnite in 2018. In Fortnite, we constantly use all kinds of skins and emotes to socialize with friends. But, I found out my Fortnite friends are still dying to know the facial reactions behind the avatar of others when expressed via avatars in-game. So, I started to think if there is a product to bring those avatar-based social experiences into a broader daily use case on the smartphone.

Without real emotions input, you are less likely to build a trustable virtual identity in the long term. We all know most of the emojis we got weren't the real emotion. Many social apps already have a successful avatar platform, but the users see it as another kind of animated sticker, or emoji, not an identity. Instead, we focus on creating a sense of an emotional tie between the human and the avatar.